There are 486 questions on various topics in Neurology in the FrontalCortex neurology question bank.

Extraocular muscles

Topic: Anatomy

Created on Tuesday, July 11 2006 by

Last modified on Wednesday, December 31 1969.

A 114 year-old male lawyer visits you in the office, complaining of diplopia.
You note that most of the time that he is facing you and talking, he sits with his chin held down and his head tilted and turned with his right ear held close to his right shoulder.
Based on this information alone, you suspect that there may be a paresis of which extraocular muscle?

 
        A) Left oblique rectus
 
        B) Left inferior rectus
 
        C) Right inferior rectus
 
        D) Left superior rectus
 
        E) Left superior oblique
 

 


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This question was created on July 11, 2006 by .
This question was last modified on December 31, 1969.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANSWERS AND EXPLANATIONS




A) left oblique rectus

This answer is incorrect.


This presentation is typical of a paresis of the left superior oblique. The left oblique rectus is not a real muscle.  (See References)

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B) left inferior rectus

This answer is incorrect.


This presentation is typical of a paresis of the left superior oblique. A patient with a paresis of the left inferior rectus muscle will have impaired depression and outward rotation of the left eye, and is likely to try to minimize his diplopia by looking at the world with his chin held down with no extraordinary tilting of his head.  (See References)

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C) right inferior rectus

This answer is incorrect.


This presentation is typical of a paresis of the left superior oblique. A patient with a paresis of the right inferior rectus muscle will have impaired depression and outward rotation of the right eye, and is likely to try to minimize his diplopia by looking at the world with his chin held down with no extraordinary tilting of his head.  (See References)

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D) left superior rectus

This answer is incorrect.


This presentation is typical of a paresis of the left superior oblique. A patient with a paresis of the left superior rectus muscle will have impaired elevation and inward rotation of the left eye, and is likely to try to minimize his diplopia by looking at the world with his chin raised, with his head extended and tilted toward his right shouder.  (See References)

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E) left superior oblique

This answer is correct.


This presentation is typical of a paresis of the left superior oblique. A patient with a paresis of the left superior oblique muscle will have impaired depression and inward rotation of the left eye, and is likely to try to minimize his diplopia by looking at the world with his chin held down and his head tilted and turned with his right ear held close to his right shoulder.  (See References)

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References:

1. Ross, R.T. (1999). How to Examine the Nervous System, 3rd Edition. Appleton & Lange, Stamford, Connecticut. Pp. 45-60
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anatomy
Extraocular muscles
Question ID: 0000003
Question written by . (C) FrontalCortex.com 2006-2009, all rights reserved. Created: 07/11/2006
Modified: 12/31/1969
Estimated Permutations: 0

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