The FrontalCortex question bank can help you study for the Residency Inservice Training Exam (RITE exam).

Neuroanatomic correlates of stroke-related myocardial injury

Topic: Anatomy

Created on Sunday, February 10 2008 by jdmiles

Last modified on Sunday, February 10 2008.

Myocardial infarction after a stroke, occurring without any apparent primary cardiac cause:

 
        A) Is associated with infarction of the right insula
 
        B) Is associated with infarction of the pons
 
        C) Is associated with infarction of the left insula
 
        D) Has not been substantiated with any credible evidence
 
        E) Is associated with infarction of the left prefrontal area
 

 


Back to the question = Go back to the top of the page.
See another question like this one = Reload a different version of this question ().
Click here for a random question = Load a random question from the database.
Clone this question = Use this question as a template to create a totally NEW question.
Rate this question = Enter detailed rating for this question!
Average user rating for this question = 3 = How users like you have rated this question.
This question was created on February 10, 2008 by jdmiles.
This question was last modified on February 10, 2008.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANSWERS AND EXPLANATIONS




A) is associated with infarction of the right insula

This answer is correct.


Diffuse myocardial damage can occur after stroke, without any apparent primary cardiac cause. A study comparing the MRIs of 50 such patients with 50 control patients showed that the right posterior, superior, and medial insula and the right inferior parietal lobule were involved more often in the strokes associated with myocardial damage.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 3
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




B) is associated with infarction of the pons

This answer is incorrect.


Diffuse myocardial damage can occur after stroke, without any apparent primary cardiac cause. A study comparing the MRIs of 50 such patients with 50 control patients showed that the right posterior, superior, and medial insula and the right inferior parietal lobule were involved more often in the strokes associated with myocardial damage.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 3
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




C) is associated with infarction of the left insula

This answer is incorrect.


Diffuse myocardial damage can occur after stroke, without any apparent primary cardiac cause. A study comparing the MRIs of 50 such patients with 50 control patients showed that the right posterior, superior, and medial insula and the right inferior parietal lobule were involved more often in the strokes associated with myocardial damage.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 3
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




D) has not been substantiated with any credible evidence

This answer is incorrect.


Diffuse myocardial damage can occur after stroke, without any apparent primary cardiac cause. A study comparing the MRIs of 50 such patients with 50 control patients showed that the right posterior, superior, and medial insula and the right inferior parietal lobule were involved more often in the strokes associated with myocardial damage.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 3
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




E) is associated with infarction of the left prefrontal area

This answer is incorrect.


Diffuse myocardial damage can occur after stroke, without any apparent primary cardiac cause. A study comparing the MRIs of 50 such patients with 50 control patients showed that the right posterior, superior, and medial insula and the right inferior parietal lobule were involved more often in the strokes associated with myocardial damage.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 3
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

References:

1. Ay, H., Koroshetz, W.J., Benner, T., Vangel, M.G., Melinosky, C., Arsava, E.M., Ayata, C., Zhu, M., Schwamm, L.H., and Sorensen, A.G. (2006). "Neuroanatomic correlates of stroke-related myocardial injury." Neurology, 66(9) 1325-9. (PMID:16525122)
Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 3
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

FrontalCortex.com -- Neurology Review Questions -- Neurology Boards -- Board Review -- Residency Inservice Training Exam -- RITE Exam Review
anatomy
Neuroanatomic correlates of stroke-related myocardial injury
Question ID: 021008145
Question written by J. Douglas Miles, (C) 2006-2009, all rights reserved.
Created: 02/10/2008
Modified: 02/10/2008
Estimated Permutations: 600

User Comments About This Question: