Check out the user forums pages.

Guess the disease!

Topic: Behavior

Created on Wednesday, February 21 2007 by jdmiles

Last modified on Wednesday, February 21 2007.

GUESS WHAT I'M THINKING!

I'm thinking of a myelopathy related to infection with the HTLV-I virus. It is endemic to Martinique, Jamaica, Colombia and Japan. Key clinical signs include slowly progressing paraparesis with increased DTRs and positive Babinski.
What disease am I thinking of?

 
        A) Asperger Syndrome
 
        B) Williams Syndrome
 
        C) Hemifacial Spasm
 
        D) Brown-Sequard Syndrome
 
        E) Tropical Spastic Paraparesis
 

 


Back to the question = Go back to the top of the page.
See another question like this one = Reload a different version of this question ().
Click here for a random question = Load a random question from the database.
Clone this question = Use this question as a template to create a totally NEW question.
Rate this question = Enter detailed rating for this question!
Average user rating for this question = 4 = How users like you have rated this question.
This question was created on February 21, 2007 by jdmiles.
This question was last modified on February 21, 2007.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANSWERS AND EXPLANATIONS




A) Asperger Syndrome

This answer is incorrect.


Asperger Syndrome is a disorder thought to typify a high-functioning variant of Autism. These patients may be adept at various cognitive skills, but have difficulty relating socially or emotionally with others.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 4
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




B) Williams Syndrome

This answer is incorrect.


Williams Syndrome is a disease, also called elfin facies syndrome, which is a congenital form of mental retardation related to an abnormality on chromosome 7. Patients are mildly developmentally delayed, but retain musical ability and social skills. Motor skills are impaired. Patients tend also to have supravalvular aortic stenosis.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 4
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




C) Hemifacial Spasm

This answer is incorrect.


Hemifacial Spasm is a disorder characterised by painless twitching of the muscles on one side of the face (in 5%, bilateral, but asynchronous when it is). Usually caused by arterial compression of the facial nerve, which results in focal demyelination followed by ephaptic coupling of parallel axons. It can also result from Bell's palsy. Medcial treatments include Carbemazepine, baclofen, gabapentin and botulinum toxin. Surgical decompression of the nerve is a highly successful procedure, with some risks, including monaural deafness.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 4
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




D) Brown-Sequard Syndrome

This answer is incorrect.


Brown-Sequard Syndrome is a homolateral paralysis which spares the face, with ipsilateral loss of position and vibratory sense, and contralateral loss of temperature and pain. Results from a unilateral spinal cord lesion.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 4
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




E) Tropical Spastic Paraparesis

This answer is correct.


Tropical Spastic Paraparesis is a myelopathy related to infection with the HTLV-I virus. It is endemic to Martinique, Jamaica, Colombia and Japan. Key clinical signs include slowly progressing paraparesis with increased DTRs and positive Babinski.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 4
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

References:

1. Victor, M., and Ropper, A.H. (2001). Adams and Victor's Principles of Neurology, 7th Edition. McGraw-Hill, New York.
Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 4
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

FrontalCortex.com -- Neurology Review Questions -- Neurology Boards -- Board Review -- Residency Inservice Training Exam -- RITE Exam Review
behavior
Guess the disease!
Question ID: 02210701
Question written by J. Douglas Miles, (C) 2006-2009, all rights reserved.
Created: 02/21/2007
Modified: 02/21/2007
Estimated Permutations: 0

User Comments About This Question:

0 user entries
Please log in if you'd like to add a comment.