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Cortical Stroke Syndromes 01

Topic: Adult

Created on Monday, April 9 2007 by jdmiles

Last modified on Monday, April 9 2007.

A patient presents with a stroke. Physical exam reveals obvious blindness, but denies that he is blind. What is the name of this syndrome?

 
        A) Balint syndrome
 
        B) Gerstmann syndrome
 
        C) Prosopagnosia
 
        D) Anton Syndrome
 
        E) Cortical blindness
 

 


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This question was created on April 09, 2007 by jdmiles.
This question was last modified on April 09, 2007.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANSWERS AND EXPLANATIONS




A) Balint syndrome

This answer is incorrect.


Balint syndrome is the triad of optic ataxia, psychic paralysis of gaze, and visual inattention to the periphery. It is associated with bilateral damage to the parieto-occipital regions.  (See References)

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B) Gerstmann syndrome

This answer is incorrect.


The cardinal features of Gerstmann syndrome are finger agnosia, left/right confusion, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia. Word blindness and/or a visual field cut may also be present. Complete blindness is not a characteristic feature of Gerstmann syndrome.  (See References)

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C) prosopagnosia

This answer is incorrect.


Prosopagnosia is a condition in which a patient cannot recognize familiar faces.  (See References)

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D) Anton Syndrome

This answer is correct.


Anton Syndrome, or visual anosognosia, is the denial of blindness by a patient who is obviously blind.  (See References)

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E) cortical blindness

This answer is incorrect.


Cortical blindness is the loss of sight resulting from damage to bilateral occipital lobes. Denial of blindness by the patient is not a characteristic feature of cortical blindness.  (See References)

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References:

1. Victor, M., and Ropper, A.H. (2001). Adams and Victor's Principles of Neurology, 7th Edition. McGraw-Hill, New York.
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adult
Cortical Stroke Syndromes 01
Question ID: 040907089
Question written by J. Douglas Miles, (C) 2006-2009, all rights reserved.
Created: 04/09/2007
Modified: 04/09/2007
Estimated Permutations: 240

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