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Neurooncology 01

Topic: Adult

Created on Saturday, October 20 2007 by jdmiles

Last modified on Saturday, October 20 2007.

Which of the following statements about intracranial tumors is most accurate?

 
        A) Brain metastases are the most common intracranial tumors in adults
 
        B) Brain metastases occur in approximately 80% to 95% of people with systemic cancer
 
        C) Brain metastases occur in approximately 5% to 10% of people with systemic cancer
 
        D) Primary CNS tumors are the most common intracranial tumors in adults
 
        E) Primary CNS tumors are the most common type of neoplasm in children
 

 


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This question was created on October 20, 2007 by jdmiles.
This question was last modified on October 20, 2007.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANSWERS AND EXPLANATIONS




A) Brain metastases are the most common intracranial tumors in adults

This answer is correct.


In the adult population, metastases to the brain comprise the most common intracranial tumors. Various sources estimate that the incidence of brain metastases is anywhere from 2 to 10 times higher than that of primary CNS tumors in adults.

Metastases to the brain are the most common neuurologic complication of systemic cancer, occurring in 20% to 40% of cases.

Primary brain tumors account for approximately 2% of all cancers, making them about 1/5 as common as lung or breast cancer.

Prognosis for people with intracerebral metastases is poor.

In contrast, primary CNS tumors are much more common than metastatic brain tumors in the pediatric population. Primary CNS tumors are the most common solid tumors in children, and are the second most common neoplasm in children after leukemia and lymphoma. Brain tumors account for approximately 20% of all malignancies in patients under age 15.

  (See References)

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B) Brain metastases occur in approximately 80% to 95% of people with systemic cancer

This answer is incorrect.


In the adult population, metastases to the brain comprise the most common intracranial tumors. Various sources estimate that the incidence of brain metastases is anywhere from 2 to 10 times higher than that of primary CNS tumors in adults.

Metastases to the brain are the most common neuurologic complication of systemic cancer, occurring in 20% to 40% of cases.

Primary brain tumors account for approximately 2% of all cancers, making them about 1/5 as common as lung or breast cancer.

Prognosis for people with intracerebral metastases is poor.

In contrast, primary CNS tumors are much more common than metastatic brain tumors in the pediatric population. Primary CNS tumors are the most common solid tumors in children, and are the second most common neoplasm in children after leukemia and lymphoma. Brain tumors account for approximately 20% of all malignancies in patients under age 15.

  (See References)

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C) Brain metastases occur in approximately 5% to 10% of people with systemic cancer

This answer is incorrect.


In the adult population, metastases to the brain comprise the most common intracranial tumors. Various sources estimate that the incidence of brain metastases is anywhere from 2 to 10 times higher than that of primary CNS tumors in adults.

Metastases to the brain are the most common neuurologic complication of systemic cancer, occurring in 20% to 40% of cases.

Primary brain tumors account for approximately 2% of all cancers, making them about 1/5 as common as lung or breast cancer.

Prognosis for people with intracerebral metastases is poor.

In contrast, primary CNS tumors are much more common than metastatic brain tumors in the pediatric population. Primary CNS tumors are the most common solid tumors in children, and are the second most common neoplasm in children after leukemia and lymphoma. Brain tumors account for approximately 20% of all malignancies in patients under age 15.

  (See References)

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D) Primary CNS tumors are the most common intracranial tumors in adults

This answer is incorrect.


In the adult population, metastases to the brain comprise the most common intracranial tumors. Various sources estimate that the incidence of brain metastases is anywhere from 2 to 10 times higher than that of primary CNS tumors in adults.

Metastases to the brain are the most common neuurologic complication of systemic cancer, occurring in 20% to 40% of cases.

Primary brain tumors account for approximately 2% of all cancers, making them about 1/5 as common as lung or breast cancer.

Prognosis for people with intracerebral metastases is poor.

In contrast, primary CNS tumors are much more common than metastatic brain tumors in the pediatric population. Primary CNS tumors are the most common solid tumors in children, and are the second most common neoplasm in children after leukemia and lymphoma. Brain tumors account for approximately 20% of all malignancies in patients under age 15.

  (See References)

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E) Primary CNS tumors are the most common type of neoplasm in children

This answer is incorrect.


In the adult population, metastases to the brain comprise the most common intracranial tumors. Various sources estimate that the incidence of brain metastases is anywhere from 2 to 10 times higher than that of primary CNS tumors in adults.

Metastases to the brain are the most common neuurologic complication of systemic cancer, occurring in 20% to 40% of cases.

Primary brain tumors account for approximately 2% of all cancers, making them about 1/5 as common as lung or breast cancer.

Prognosis for people with intracerebral metastases is poor.

In contrast, primary CNS tumors are much more common than metastatic brain tumors in the pediatric population. Primary CNS tumors are the most common solid tumors in children, and are the second most common neoplasm in children after leukemia and lymphoma. Brain tumors account for approximately 20% of all malignancies in patients under age 15.

  (See References)

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References:

1. Victor, M., and Ropper, A.H. (2001). Adams and Victor's Principles of Neurology, 7th Edition. McGraw-Hill, New York. (ISBN:0070674973) Advertising:
2. Kanner, A.A., Bokstein, F., Blumenthal, D.T., and Ram, Z. (2007). "Surgical therapies in brain metastasis." Semin Oncol, 34(3) 197-205. (PMID:17560981)
3. Vogelbaum, M.A., and Suh, J.H. (2006). "Resectable brain metastases." J Clin Oncol, 24(8) 1289-94. (PMID:16525184)
4. Pease, N.J., Edwards, A., and Moss, L.J. (2005). "Effectiveness of whole brain radiotherapy in the treatment of brain metastases: a systematic review." Palliat Med, 19(4) 288-99. (PMID:15984501)
5. Lovo, E., Torrealba, G., Villanueva, P., Gejman, R., and Tagle, P. (2005). "[Survival of patients with brain metastases]" Rev Med Chil, 133(2) 190-4. (PMID:15824828)
6. Grier, J., and Batchelor, T. (2004). "Metastatic neurologic complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma." Curr Oncol Rep, 7(1) 55-60. (PMID:15610687)
7. Schiff, D., and Wen, P. (2004). Nervous system metastases. In Bradley, W.G., Daroff, R.B., Fenichel, G.M., and Jankovic, J. (Eds.). Neurology in Clinical Practice, Fourth Edition. Butterworth Heinemann, Philadelphia, pp. 1441-1459 (ISBN:0750674695). Advertising:
8. Tosoni, A., Ermani, M., and Brandes, A.A. (2004). "The pathogenesis and treatment of brain metastases: a comprehensive review." Crit Rev Oncol Hematol, 52(3) 199-215. (PMID:15582786)
9. Sheehan, J., Niranjan, A., Flickinger, J.C., Kondziolka, D., and Lunsford, L.D. (2004). "The expanding role of neurosurgeons in the management of brain metastases." Surg Neurol, 62(1) 32-40; discussion 40-1. (PMID:15226065)
10. Batchelor, T.T., Dorfman, M.V., and Hunter, D.J. (2004). Epidemiology of primary brain tumors. In Bradley, W.G., Daroff, R.B., Fenichel, G.M., and Jankovic, J. (Eds.). Neurology in Clinical Practice, Fourth Edition. Butterworth Heinemann, Philadelphia, pp. 1329-1340 (ISBN:0750674695). Advertising:
11. Wen, P.Y., and Loeffler, J.S. (1999). "Management of brain metastases." Oncology (Williston Park), 13(7) 941-54, 957-61; discussion 961-2, 9. (PMID:10442342)
12. Johnson, J.D., and Young, B. (1996). "Demographics of brain metastasis." Neurosurg Clin N Am, 7(3) 337-44. (PMID:8823767)
13. Sawaya, R., Ligon, B.L., and Bindal, R.K. (1994). "Management of metastatic brain tumors." Ann Surg Oncol, 1(2) 169-78. (PMID:7834443)
14. Patchell, R.A. (1991). "Brain metastases." Neurol Clin, 9(4) 817-24. (PMID:1758427)
15. Maher, C.O., and Raffel, C. (2004). "Neurosurgical treatment of brain tumors in children." Pediatr Clin North Am, 51(2) 327-57. (PMID:15062674)
16. Luh, G.Y., and Bird, C.R. (1999). "Imaging of brain tumors in the pediatric population." Neuroimaging Clin N Am, 9(4) 691-716. (PMID:10517940)
17. Clarson, C.L., and Del Maestro, R.F. (1999). "Growth failure after treatment of pediatric brain tumors." Pediatrics, 103(3) E37. (PMID:10049993)
18. Griffin, C.A., Hawkins, A.L., Packer, R.J., Rorke, L.B., and Emanuel, B.S. (1988). "Chromosome abnormalities in pediatric brain tumors." Cancer Res, 48(1) 175-80. (PMID:3334992)
19. Rowland, L.P. (Ed) (2000). Merritt's Neurology, 10th Edition. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia. (ISBN:0683304747) Advertising:
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adult
Neurooncology 01
Question ID: 102007043
Question written by J. Douglas Miles, (C) 2006-2009, all rights reserved.
Created: 10/20/2007
Modified: 10/20/2007
Estimated Permutations: 75600

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