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Brown-Séquard Syndrome 02

Topic: Anatomy

Created on Sunday, January 27 2008 by jdmiles

Last modified on Sunday, January 27 2008.

Just for giggles, a well-intentioned but misguided grizzly bear impersonator skillfully transects through the entire right half of your spinal cord at the T7 level. You will now have which of the following deficits below the level of the lesion?

 
        A) Loss of vibration sensation on the left
 
        B) Loss of light touch sensation on the left
 
        C) Loss of pain sensation on the right
 
        D) Loss of proprioception on the left
 
        E) Loss of pain sensation on the left
 

 


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This question was created on January 27, 2008 by jdmiles.
This question was last modified on January 27, 2008.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANSWERS AND EXPLANATIONS




A) loss of vibration sensation on the left

This answer is incorrect.


The injury described gives rise to the Brown-Sequard syndrome. This syndrome consists of weakness and loss of proprioception and vibration sensation and ipsilateral to the lesion, and loss of pain and temperature on the contralateral side. There is usually little loss of tactile sensation.  (See References)

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B) loss of light touch sensation on the left

This answer is incorrect.


The injury described gives rise to the Brown-Sequard syndrome. This syndrome consists of weakness and loss of proprioception and vibration sensation and ipsilateral to the lesion, and loss of pain and temperature on the contralateral side. There is usually little loss of tactile sensation.  (See References)

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C) loss of pain sensation on the right

This answer is incorrect.


The injury described gives rise to the Brown-Sequard syndrome. This syndrome consists of weakness and loss of proprioception and vibration sensation and ipsilateral to the lesion, and loss of pain and temperature on the contralateral side. There is usually little loss of tactile sensation.  (See References)

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D) loss of proprioception on the left

This answer is incorrect.


The injury described gives rise to the Brown-Sequard syndrome. This syndrome consists of weakness and loss of proprioception and vibration sensation and ipsilateral to the lesion, and loss of pain and temperature on the contralateral side. There is usually little loss of tactile sensation.  (See References)

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E) loss of pain sensation on the left

This answer is correct.


The injury described gives rise to the Brown-Sequard syndrome. This syndrome consists of weakness and loss of proprioception and vibration sensation and ipsilateral to the lesion, and loss of pain and temperature on the contralateral side. There is usually little loss of tactile sensation.  (See References)

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References:

1. Nolte, J. (1993). The Human Brain: An Introduction to Its Functional Anatomy. Mosby, St. Louis. (ISBN:0801674832)Advertising:
2. Byrne, T.N., and Wakman, S.G. (2004). Paraplegia and spinal cord syndromes. In Bradley, W.G., Daroff, R.B., Fenichel, G.M., and Jankovic, J. (Eds.). Neurology in Clinical Practice, Fourth Edition. Butterworth Heinemann, Philadelphia, pp. 351-365 (ISBN:0750674695).Advertising:
3. Victor, M., and Ropper, A.H. (2001). Adams and Victor's Principles of Neurology, 7th Edition. McGraw-Hill, New York. (ISBN:0070674973)Advertising:
4. Rowland, L.P. (Ed) (2000). Merritt's Neurology, 10th Edition. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia. (ISBN:0683304747)Advertising:
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anatomy
Brown-Séquard Syndrome 02
Question ID: 01270805
Question written by J. Douglas Miles, (C) 2006-2009, all rights reserved.
Created: 01/27/2008
Modified: 01/27/2008
Estimated Permutations: 9000

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