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Cerebrovascular Anatomy 02

Topic: Anatomy

Created on Friday, October 12 2007 by jdmiles

Last modified on Friday, October 12 2007.

An occlusion of the indicated vessel would result in which of the following deficits?


 
        A) A facial droop
 
        B) Anton syndrome
 
        C) Global aphasia
 
        D) Hemineglect
 
        E) Hemiparesis which affects the lower extremity more than the upper extremity
 

 


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This question was created on October 12, 2007 by jdmiles.
This question was last modified on October 12, 2007.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANSWERS AND EXPLANATIONS




A) A facial droop

This answer is incorrect.


The arrow in this gadolinium bolus MR angiogram indicates the left anterior cerebral artery. An occlusion of this vessel would produce hemiparesis of the lower extremity, sparing the face and upper extremity.  (See References)

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B) Anton syndrome

This answer is incorrect.


The arrow in this gadolinium bolus MR angiogram indicates the left anterior cerebral artery.  An occlusion of this vessel would produce hemiparesis of the lower extremity, sparing the face and upper extremity.

Anton syndrome (denial of blindness by a person who obviously cannot see) is associated with lesions in the visual association cortex.   

  (See References)

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C) Global aphasia

This answer is incorrect.


The arrow in this gadolinium bolus MR angiogram indicates the left anterior cerebral artery. An occlusion of this vessel would produce hemiparesis of the lower extremity, sparing the face and upper extremity.  (See References)

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D) Hemineglect

This answer is incorrect.


The arrow in this gadolinium bolus MR angiogram indicates the left anterior cerebral artery. An occlusion of this vessel would produce hemiparesis of the lower extremity, sparing the face and upper extremity.

Hemineglect is seen in people with lesions of the left parietal cortex. 

  (See References)

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E) Hemiparesis which affects the lower extremity more than the upper extremity

This answer is correct.


The arrow in this gadolinium bolus MR angiogram indicates the left anterior cerebral artery. An occlusion of this vessel would produce hemiparesis of the lower extremity, sparing the face and upper extremity.  (See References)

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References:

1. Sandhu, J.S., and Wakhloo, A.K. (2004). Neuroangiographic anatomy and common cerebrovascular diseases. In Bradley, W.G., Daroff, R.B., Fenichel, G.M., and Jankovic, J. (Eds.). Neurology in Clinical Practice, Fourth Edition. Butterworth Heinemann, Philadelphia, pp. 625-643 (ISBN:0750674695).Advertising:
2. David L. Felten, Ralph F., Md. Jozefowicz, Frank H., Md. Netter, . . ICON Learning Systems (ISBN:1929007167)Advertising:
3. Duane E. Haines; special contributions by John A. Lancon; illustrator, M. P. Schenk; photographer, G. W. Armstrong. Neuroanatomy: an atlas of structures, sections, and systems. Philadelphia : Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, c2004. (ISBN:0781746779)Advertising:
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anatomy
Cerebrovascular Anatomy 02
Question ID: 101207048
Question written by J. Douglas Miles, (C) 2006-2009, all rights reserved.
Created: 10/12/2007
Modified: 10/12/2007
Estimated Permutations: 1800

User Comments About This Question:

1 user entries
 

jdmiles
anatomy Try reloading this question. Oct 22, 2007 @ 19:44

This question has a good number of images and permutations programmed into it.

Hit the "reload" button a few times, and you'll see what I mean.

-jdm 



 
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