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Pathology of primary CNS angiitis

Topic: Pathology

Created on Friday, December 7 2007 by jdmiles

Last modified on Friday, December 7 2007.

Which of the following pathological findings is most characteristic of primary angiitis of the CNS?

 
        A) Lymphocytic infiltration of the arteries
 
        B) Inflammation of the arteries, with multinucleated giant cells proliferating in the intimal layer
 
        C) Thickened arteries with granular, periodic acid-Schiff-positive material in the media
 
        D) Amyloid deposition in the media of the artery
 
        E) Granular osmiophilic material seen on electron microscopy
 

 


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This question was created on December 07, 2007 by jdmiles.
This question was last modified on December 07, 2007.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANSWERS AND EXPLANATIONS




A) Lymphocytic infiltration of the arteries

This answer is incorrect.


Arteries with mononuclear infiltration are characteristic of giant cell arteritis, but not of primary angiitis of the CNS.  (See References)

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B) Inflammation of the arteries, with multinucleated giant cells proliferating in the intimal layer

This answer is correct.


Arteries with multinucleated giant cells in the intima are characteristic of primary angiitis of the CNS.  (See References)

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C) Thickened arteries with granular, periodic acid-Schiff-positive material in the media

This answer is incorrect.


Thickened arteries with granular, periodic acid-Schiff-positive material in the media and granular osmiophilic material seen on electron microscopy are characteristic of Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), but not of primary angiitis of the CNS.  (See References)

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D) Amyloid deposition in the media of the artery

This answer is incorrect.


Arteries with amyloid deposition is characteristic of amyloid angiopathy, but not of primary angiitis of the CNS.  (See References)

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E) Granular osmiophilic material seen on electron microscopy

This answer is incorrect.


Thickened arteries with granular, periodic acid-Schiff-positive material in the media and granular osmiophilic material seen on electron microscopy are characteristic of Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), but not of primary angiitis of the CNS.  (See References)

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References:

1. Prayson, R.A., and Goldblum, J.R. (Eds.) (2005). Neuropathology. Elsevier Churchill Livingstone, Philadelphia. (ISBN:0443066582) Advertising:
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pathology
Pathology of primary CNS angiitis
Question ID: 120707030
Question written by J. Douglas Miles, (C) 2006-2009, all rights reserved.
Created: 12/07/2007
Modified: 12/07/2007
Estimated Permutations: 600

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