FrontalCortex, Inc. is a non-profit corporation dedicated to neurology education.

Neuron Action Potential

Topic: Physiology

Created on Tuesday, February 6 2007 by jdmiles

Last modified on Tuesday, February 6 2007.

Which of the following statements most accurately describes the two major ionic currents which occur during a neuron action potential?

 
        A) Sodium flows into the cell, and Chloride flows out of the cell
 
        B) Potassium flows into the cell, and Iodine flows out of the cell
 
        C) Sodium flows into the cell, and Potassium flows out of the cell
 
        D) Chloride flows into the cell, and Magnesium flows out of the cell
 
        E) Calcium flows into the cell, and Sodium flows out of the cell
 

 


Back to the question = Go back to the top of the page.
See another question like this one = Reload a different version of this question ().
Click here for a random question = Load a random question from the database.
Clone this question = Use this question as a template to create a totally NEW question.
Rate this question = Enter detailed rating for this question!
Average user rating for this question = 3 = How users like you have rated this question.
This question was created on February 06, 2007 by jdmiles.
This question was last modified on February 06, 2007.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANSWERS AND EXPLANATIONS




A) Sodium flows into the cell, and Chloride flows out of the cell

This answer is incorrect.


The properties of an action potenial are primarily determined by the interplay between sodium and potassium ionic currents. During an action potential, sodium flows into the neuron, causing depolarization. Potassium flows out of the cell, helping to restore membrane resting potential. Other ions are typically involved, however these are the two ionic currents which are believed to have the largest impact on the morphology of the action potential.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 3
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




B) Potassium flows into the cell, and Iodine flows out of the cell

This answer is incorrect.


The properties of an action potenial are primarily determined by the interplay between sodium and potassium ionic currents. During an action potential, sodium flows into the neuron, causing depolarization. Potassium flows out of the cell, helping to restore membrane resting potential. Other ions are typically involved, however these are the two ionic currents which are believed to have the largest impact on the morphology of the action potential.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 3
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




C) Sodium flows into the cell, and Potassium flows out of the cell

This answer is correct.


The properties of an action potenial are primarily determined by the interplay between sodium and potassium ionic currents. During an action potential, sodium flows into the neuron, causing depolarization. Potassium flows out of the cell, helping to restore membrane resting potential. Other ions are typically involved, however these are the two ionic currents which are believed to have the largest impact on the morphology of the action potential.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 3
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




D) Chloride flows into the cell, and Magnesium flows out of the cell

This answer is incorrect.


The properties of an action potenial are primarily determined by the interplay between sodium and potassium ionic currents. During an action potential, sodium flows into the neuron, causing depolarization. Potassium flows out of the cell, helping to restore membrane resting potential. Other ions are typically involved, however these are the two ionic currents which are believed to have the largest impact on the morphology of the action potential.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 3
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




E) Calcium flows into the cell, and Sodium flows out of the cell

This answer is incorrect.


The properties of an action potenial are primarily determined by the interplay between sodium and potassium ionic currents. During an action potential, sodium flows into the neuron, causing depolarization. Potassium flows out of the cell, helping to restore membrane resting potential. Other ions are typically involved, however these are the two ionic currents which are believed to have the largest impact on the morphology of the action potential.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 3
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

References:

1. Kandel, E.R., Schwartz, J.H., and Jessel, T.M. (2000). Principles of Neural Science, 4th ed. McGraw-Hill, New York.
Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 3
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

FrontalCortex.com -- Neurology Review Questions -- Neurology Boards -- Board Review -- Residency Inservice Training Exam -- RITE Exam Review
physiology
Neuron Action Potential
Question ID: 020607076
Question written by J. Douglas Miles, (C) 2006-2009, all rights reserved.
Created: 02/06/2007
Modified: 02/06/2007
Estimated Permutations: 1275120

User Comments About This Question:

0 user entries
Please log in if you'd like to add a comment.