FrontalCortex, Inc. is a non-profit corporation dedicated to neurology education.

Absence Seizure Treatment

Topic: Pediatric

Created on Friday, June 8 2007 by jdmiles

Last modified on Friday, June 8 2007.

An 8 year old female presents with staring spells 10-20 times per day for over 6 months. She has not had any motor seizures according to the family, and has no prior history of seizures. She has no other known medical problems, and has had normal intellectual development. Physical exam is normal, except that an absence seizure can be elicited by having the patient hyperventilate. EEG shows 3 Hz spike wave complexes.

Of the following choices, which is the best choice as a first-line monotherapy?


 
        A) Phenobarbital
 
        B) Gabapentin
 
        C) Ethosuximide
 
        D) Oxcarbazepine
 
        E) Diazepam
 

 


Back to the question = Go back to the top of the page.
See another question like this one = Reload a different version of this question ().
Click here for a random question = Load a random question from the database.
Clone this question = Use this question as a template to create a totally NEW question.
Rate this question = Enter detailed rating for this question!
Average user rating for this question = 4.5 = How users like you have rated this question.
This question was created on June 08, 2007 by jdmiles.
This question was last modified on June 08, 2007.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANSWERS AND EXPLANATIONS




A) phenobarbital

This answer is incorrect.


This patient's history and exam are consistent with childhood absence epilepsy. As this patient has only absence seizures, ethosuximide would be a good first line monotherapy.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 4.5
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




B) gabapentin

This answer is incorrect.


This patient's history and exam are consistent with childhood absence epilepsy. As this patient has only absence seizures, ethosuximide would be a good first line monotherapy.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 4.5
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




C) ethosuximide

This answer is correct.


This patient's history and exam are consistent with childhood absence epilepsy. As this patient has only absence seizures, ethosuximide would be a good first line monotherapy.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 4.5
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




D) oxcarbazepine

This answer is incorrect.


This patient's history and exam are consistent with childhood absence epilepsy. As this patient has only absence seizures, ethosuximide would be a good first line monotherapy.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 4.5
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




E) diazepam

This answer is incorrect.


This patient's history and exam are consistent with childhood absence epilepsy. As this patient has only absence seizures, ethosuximide would be a good first line monotherapy.  (See References)

Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 4.5
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

 

 

 

References:

1. Levin, K.H., and Luders, H.O. (Eds.) (2000). Comprehensive Clinical Neurophysiology. W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia.
2. Browne, T.R., & Holmes, G.L. (2004). Handbook of Epilepsy, 3rd Edition. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia.
Back to the questionSee another question like this oneClick here for a random questionClone this question Rate this questionAverage user rating for this question = 4.5
Please log in if you want to rate questions.

 

FrontalCortex.com -- Neurology Review Questions -- Neurology Boards -- Board Review -- Residency Inservice Training Exam -- RITE Exam Review
pediatric
Absence Seizure Treatment
Question ID: 060807021
Question written by J. Douglas Miles, (C) 2006-2009, all rights reserved.
Created: 06/08/2007
Modified: 06/08/2007
Estimated Permutations: 59400

User Comments About This Question:

0 user entries
Please log in if you'd like to add a comment.