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Triphasic Waves on EEG

Topic: Physiology

Created on Saturday, April 28 2007 by jdmiles

Last modified on Saturday, April 28 2007.

Triphasic waves on EEG:

 
        A) Are associated with hypocalcemia
 
        B) Are associated with Lennox-Gasteaut syndrome
 
        C) Are associated with absence epilepsy
 
        D) Are associated with Sturge-Weber syndrome
 
        E) Tend to disappear during sleep
 

 


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This question was created on April 28, 2007 by jdmiles.
This question was last modified on April 28, 2007.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANSWERS AND EXPLANATIONS




A) are associated with hypocalcemia

This answer is incorrect.


Triphasic waves are not characteristic of hypocalcemia. The typical EEG finding in hypocalcemia is diffuse slowing.  (See References)

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B) are associated with Lennox-Gasteaut syndrome

This answer is incorrect.


Triphasic waves are not characteristic of Lennox-Gasteaut syndrome. The typical EEG finding in Lennox-Gasteaut syndrome is generalized slow (<2.5 HZ) spike and wave complexes.  (See References)

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C) are associated with absence epilepsy

This answer is incorrect.


Triphasic waves are not characteristic of absence epilepsy. The typical EEG finding in absence epilepsy is a generalized 3Hz spike and wave pattern.  (See References)

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D) are associated with Sturge-Weber syndrome

This answer is incorrect.


Triphasic waves are not characteristic of Sturge-Weber syndrome.  (See References)

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E) tend to disappear during sleep

This answer is correct.


Triphasic waves are more likely to be seen when the patient is awake, and attenuate during sleep.  (See References)

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References:

1. Ernst, M.D. Niedermeyer (Editor), Fernando Lopes, M.D., Ph.D. Da Silva (Editor), F. H. Lopes Da Silva (Editor). Electroencephalography: Basic Principles, Clinical Applications, and Related Fields. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (ISBN:9780781751261)Advertising:
2. Levin, K.H., and Luders, H.O. (Eds.) (2000). Comprehensive Clinical Neurophysiology. W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia.
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physiology
Triphasic Waves on EEG
Question ID: 042807067
Question written by J. Douglas Miles, (C) 2006-2009, all rights reserved.
Created: 04/28/2007
Modified: 04/28/2007
Estimated Permutations: 60480

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