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White Matter and Gray Matter 1

 
Parts of a Neuron 1

 
Neuron Action Potential 2

 
Effect of Sodium Influx on a Neuron Membrane

 
Resting Potential of a Neuron 2

 
Resting Potential of a Neuron

 
Resting Potential of a Neuron
What is the approximate resting potential of a human neuron
 
NeurOnc10

 
Basic Neuropathology 9

 
Basic Neuropathology 6

 
Inclusionology 03

 
Peripheral Nervous System and Neurologic Exam - Question 2
Which of the following is not a disease process within the peripheral nervous system
 
Peripheral Nervous System and Neurologic Exam - Question 1
Which of the following is not considered part of the peripheral nervous system
 
Electromyography and Neuromuscular Disorders - Chapter 2 Quiz - Question 4
In this illustration of a neuron, what is the name of the structure indicated by the unnecessarily large green arrow
 
Electromyography and Neuromuscular Disorders - Chapter 2 Quiz - Question 1
Which of the following is not considered part of the peripheral nervous system
 
Pain in the forearm 01
A 25 year-old woman presents complaining of pain and tingling in her right arm. The pain is in her wrist, forearm, and elbow. The tingling is in her thumb and index finger. She says it's been going on for about 4 weeks, and getting worse. It frequently wakes her up at night...
 
Infections 05
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen The appearance of these cells is diagnostic of infection with which of the following viruses
 
NeurOnc 07
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen The most common location for this tumor is:
 
Neurodegen 07
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen This tau negative, ubiquitin stained section of dentate gyrus suggests that, in addition to dementia, this patient may have manifest which of the following signs
 
Neurodegen 04
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen These anterior horn cells from this 63 year old who died with ALS contain which of the following proteins
 
Malformations 03
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen This boy suffered from infantile spasms and mental retardation. In addition to the defect pictured here, the brain showed cerebral heterotopias. The best diagnosis is
 
Myelin 07
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen This form of leukoencephalopathy is most closely associated with which of the following agents
 
Myelin 05
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen This 12 year old boy was normal until age 3, when he developed progressive ataxia and spasticity. MRI demonstrated diffuse cavitation of cerebral white matter with high signal intensity in cerebellar and brainstem white matter...
 
NeurOnc 09
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen This sellar lesion most likely came from a/an:
 
NeurOnc 06
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen This specimen came from a patient with which of the following diseases
 
NeurOnc 05
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen This histologic appearance is consistent with all of the follAowing, EXCEPT
 
NeurOnc 04
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen The most common location for this tumor is:
 
Infections 09
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen Which of the following cell types is primarily infected in this viral infection
 
Motor Neuron Disorders 01
Which of the following statements is true about primary lateral sclerosis
 
NeurOnc 03
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen The most common location for this neoplasm is:
 
Infections 02
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen Cowdry B inclusions, similar to those shown here, were initially felt to be diagnostic of which of the following
 
Malformations 01
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen Which of the following gene mutations is most closely associated with this neuronal migration disorder
 
NeurOnc 02
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen This pattern of tumor spread is most characteristic of which of the following tumors
 
NeurOnc 01
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen All of the following statements regarding this tumor are true EXCEPT:
 
Inclusionology 01
Courtesy of Dr. Mark Cohen Which of the following proteins is present in greatest abundance in this cytoplasmic inclusion
 
Normal Neuropil 02
The image above shows a section of normal neuropil, prepared with an H&E stain. What are the structures circled in green
 
Normal Neuropil 01
The image above shows a section of normal neuropil, prepared with an H&E stain. What are the structures circled in blue
 
Intraneuronal Inclusions 01
In the image above, note the structure indicated by the unnecessarily large green arrow. What substance is the primary constituent of this structure
 
Wilson's!
A 6-year-old male has been referred to you for further evaluation of a possible Wilson's disease because of dystonic gait and limbs. History taking and thorough physical examination are carried out by you and you think that Wilson's disease is not the correct diagnosis in this child...
 
The Plaque, Again!
A 27-year-old woman is referred to you as a newly diagnosed case of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. However, after a thorough examination, you disagree with the referring physician. What have you found
 
Type I Muscle Fibers
Which of the following statements about type I muscle fibers is most accurate
 
Cephalgia!
A 21-year-old woman presents with headache. Her headache is generalized, present most of the day and most of the year, and for the last 2 years. It is poorly responsive to indomethacine but responds well to amitriptyline. The cranials are intact, but you have...
 
Autonomic Anatomy 03
Which one of the following locations contains cell bodies of sypmathetic preganglionic efferents
 
Autonomic Anatomy 02
As a result of a complete misunderstanding, a devil-worshipping blackbird stylist lesions your intermediolateral cell column bilaterally from C8 down to L2.After this, you suffer from loss of which of the following functions
 
Neuro-Medicine...
A 19-year-old man presents with bilateral resting tremor. He has blue lunulae and sun-flower cataract. Which one of the following is not an expected finding in this man
 
Shake your hand at rest!
A middle-aged woman visits the movement disorder clinic because of hand instability. You have detected tremor but you are not sure whether this is due to Parkinson's disease or due to essential tremor. Which one of the following is suggestive of Parkinson's disease
 
Special Muscle Receptors 01
A 79 year-old houseplant canner presents to your clinic for evaluation of anxiety. During your exam, you bang on his knee with a hammer. Which of the following statements most accurately describes the afferent limb of the reflex arc you are trying to elicit
 
Agents that Affect Cholinergic Synapses - Super Quiz 01
Which of the following statements is most accurate
 
Lysosomal Storage Diseases 01
There is a deficiency in the expression or activity of a-d glucosidase in which of the following disorders
 
Copy of Bulbar Signs and Symptoms 01
A patient presents with dysphagia and dysarthria. The tongue shows atrophy and fasciculations. Sensation and gag are intact. The jaw-jerk reflex is very brisk. Of the following, which is the best description of these findings
 
Bulbar Signs and Symptoms 01
A patient presents with dysphagia and dysarthria. The tongue shows atrophy and fasciculations. Sensation and gag are intact. The jaw-jerk reflex is very brisk. Of the following, which is the best description of these findings
 
Dysphagia as a presenting symptom 01
An adolescent presents with complaints of dysphagia and dysarthria. The patient's father uncle reportedly has a history of muscle weakness that began similarly. On exam, there is wasting of the tongue, with fasciculations. The remainder of the exam is normal...
 
Werdnig-Hoffman Disease
Which of the following statements about Werdnig-Hoffman disease is most accurate
 
Pediatric Brain Tumor Pathology 01
A developmentally delayed 4 year-old male presents with several months of worsening seizures and headaches. A head CT reveals a large mass with areas of calcification. The mass is removed surgically. The image above shows an H&E stain of a section taken from the mass...
 
Cerebral Ischemia 01
In cases of mild hypoxic injury, which of the following cells are most likely to be damaged
 
Cerebellar Microanatomy 02
What kind of cell is indicated by the unnecessarily large red arrow in the picture above
 
Neurooncology Most Commons 01
Which of the following is the most common pediatric central nervous system glial neoplasm
 
Ceroid Lipofuscinoses 02
A child presents to your clinic with a history of cognitive and/or motor regression, epilepsy, and progressive blindness.  Skin biopsy shows intracellular accumulations of material that autofluoresces with a yellow-green color.What is the inheritance pattern of this disorder
 
Ceroid Lipofuscinoses 01
What are the cardinal features of ceroid lipofuscinosis
 
Hypothalamic Functions 01
Which of the following areas is associated with regulation of sleep and secretion of  hypocretin
 
Inborn Errors of Metabolism 02
Which of the following disorders is associated with cataracts
 
Dementia 02
A 80 year-old male presents to your office accompanied by his daughter, who provides most of the history. The daughter states that for the past 5 years, the patient has been having progressively worsening memory problems, has been seeing people in the room...
 
Basal Ganglia 02
The basal ganglia send output signals to the thalamus.  This is done primarily by which of the following nuclei
 
Spinal Cord Anatomy 01
The T2 MRI above shows healthy spinal cord at the C6 level.Which of the following statements is most accurate about the area highlighted in red
 
Lysosomal Storage Diseases 01
In Niemann-Pick disease type C, where is the genetic locus of the defective gene
 
Tremor 01
A very old man is seen in clinic by his Neurologist. He complains of more than 2 years of worsening tremor. The tremor is worse in the right hand. It improves slightly when he uses the hand to perform a task. He has no cognitive symptoms. He drinks 5 40-oz beers every night...
 
Cerebellar Anatomy 04
In the structure highlighted in red in the image above, parallel fibers arise from:
 
Cerebellar Anatomy 03
Fibers in the inferior cerebellar peduncle are predominantly:
 
Cerebellar Anatomy 02
The most abundant neurons in the human brain are:
 
Cerebellar Anatomy 01
In the cerebellum, parallel fibers arise from:
 
Pathology in Ischemic Stroke 03
A patient presents with an acute ischemic stroke and dies 6 months later. Of the following choices, which is most likely to be seen on pathological examination of the brain at autopsy
 
Pathology in Ischemic Stroke 02
A patient presents with an acute ischemic stroke and dies 1 week later. Of the following choices, which is most likely to be seen on pathological examination of the brain at autopsy
 
Pathology in Ischemic Stroke 01
A patient presents with an acute ischemic stroke and dies 18 hours after onset of symptoms. Of the following choices, which is most likely to be seen on pathology
 
Neuron Action Potential
Which of the following statements most accurately describes the two major ionic currents which occur during a neuron action potential
 



User Forums and Comments



Re: Re: Comment
Actually, all the choices represent some form of spontaneous activity.  The question is about the generator of said activity.  Fasciculations, doublets, triplets, multiplets, myokymia, cramp potentials, neuromyotonic potentials, and the potentials of a resting...
 
Re: laminar necrosis
Suzanne, Laminar necrosis is the selective loss of the metabolically specialized, and therefore more oxygen/blood flow dependent, neurons which occupy layers III, V, and VI.I've not heard of post-infectious cerebritis, so I can't help you with this...
 
Re: Re: how do we tell the difference between DNT and oligodendr
One of the original authors of the DNT paper has gone so far to say that a CORTICALLY-BASED tumor in a young patient presenting with seizures is a DNT till proved otherwise. In the specific glioneuronal element of DNT, the neurons appear to float free in lots of extracellular mucopolysaccharide matrix...
 
Re: how do we tell the difference between DNT and oligodendrogli
Ingy -Thanks for the excellent question.Admittedly, oligodendroglioma and dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT) look a lot alike, and you might not be able to tell the difference between them if all you saw was one slide.  For examination purposes,...
 
Comment
intraneuronal inclusion
 



Online Course Content



White Matter (image)

 
Cells are Batteries
 Section 1: Cells are BatteriesCells are Batteries.  They generate an electrical potential (voltage) across the cell membrane.  For most cells, this is analogous to the DC current generated by a battery.   The video above shows how the voltage across...
 
Synapses and the Neuromuscular Junction (NMJ)
 Section 6:  Synapses and the Neuromuscular Junction (NMJ)Neurons can use electrical potentials to send signals from one part of the neuron to another, but to communicate with other neurons (or muscle cells or other target cells), they usually use chemical signals...
 
Muscle Fiber Action Potential
 Section 5: Muscle Fiber Action PotentialWhen the cell membrane of neurons or muscle fibers is depolarized enough, they propagate a nondecremental wave of electrical polarization called an action potential.  Neurons use these action potentials to quickly transmit information across distance...
 
The Neuron Action Potential
 Section 4: Neuron Action PotentialWhen the cell membrane of neurons or muscle fibers is depolarized enough, they propagate a nondecremental wave of electrical polarization called an action potential.  Neurons use these action potentials to quickly transmit information across distance...
 
Meat Wires
 Section 3:  Meat WiresNerve cells (neurons) and muscle cells (muscle fibers) are specialized cells whose cell membrane potential can change.  These changes contribute to the basic functioning of these cells.  Nerve cell processes can carry electical signals similar to how wires do...
 
Why Are Cells Batteries?
 Section 2:  Why Are Cells BatteriesIn this second section of this chapter, we explore the origin of the cell membrane potential.  We've established that Cells are Batteries. Batteries have an electrical potential.  That's what makes them batteries...
 
Neuron with oligodendrocyte and myelin (image)

 
Neuron Action Potential 2
488
 
Neuron Action Potential
177
 
Effect of Sodium Influx on a Neuron Membrane
487
 
Resting Potential of a Neuron 2
486
 
Neuron Resting Potential
485
 
Basic Physiology of Nerve and Muscle
 Basic Physiology of Nerve and MuscleLearning objectives:   To gain an understanding of basic physiology of nerves and muscleTo understand what a membrane potential is and what makes it happenTo understand what an action potential is, and how it comes aboutTo...
 
Introduction to the Nervous System
Introduction to the Nervous SystemYou may want to start by reviewing anatomical directions and planes of section, particularly as they apply to neuroanatomy.  If you are already really comfrotable with this nomenclature, click here to start with a brief introduction to nerve cell physiology...
 
Electric Meat
Electric MeatWhy is the nervous system different from skin, liver, kidneys, or spleen  The fundamental building blocks of the nervous system and muscles are electrically active cells.   These cells process inputs and generate outputs.  Neurons are individual...
 
Audition and the Vestibular System
Audition and the Vestibular SystemAn introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the ear and structures involved in hearing and the vestibular system.Terminology:By the end of this section, make certain that you understand what each of these terms mean, and can apply them appropriately...
 
Vision
VisionA introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the eye and structures that are involved in vision.Terminology:By the end of this section, make certain that you understand what each of these terms mean, and can apply them appropriately.  If applicable,...
 
Motor Cranial Nerves
Motor Cranial NervesThis section describes the cranial nerves that carry motor information. Also discusses corticobulbar pathways.Terminology:By the end of this section, make certain that you understand what each of these terms mean, and can apply them appropriately...
 
Motor Pathways
Motor PathwaysThis section describes the anatomical structures that carry motor information from the brain to the body, including upper motor neuron and lower motor neuron pathways.Terminology:By the end of this section, make certain that you understand what...
 
Grey Matter vs White Matter (image)

 
Oligodendrocyte (image)

 
Neuron myelin segment (image)

 
Neuron myelin (image)

 
Neuron axon (image)

 
Neuron dendrites (image)

 
Neuron soma (image)

 
Neuron with connections (image)

 
Neuron with afferent connections (image)

 
Neuron, numbered (image)

 
Neuron (image)

 
Neuron (image)

 
Neuroneurocysticercosis (image)

 
Neuron Specific Antigen (image)

 
Upper vs Lower Motor Neuron Signs (image)

 
Neuron - Soma (image)

 
Drawing of a Neuron (image)

 
Basic Neuropathologic Reactions
Among the resources in this section are 5 lectures providing an overview of the basic cells of the nervous system, and their reactions to damage. For those who would prefer to read than listen:The typical neuron is pyramidal or triangular-shaped with a large,...
 
Rosetted glioneuronal tumor of the fourth ventricle, low power view (image)

 
Rosetted glial neuronal tumor of the fourth ventricle, H&E x 200 (image)

 
MSA Hot Cross Bun sign 2 (image)

 
MSA Hot Cross Bun sign (image)

 
Peripheral Neuropathy/Motor Neuron Disease
Peripheral Neuropathy/Motor Neuron DiseaseNerve            Recording Sites        Stimulation Sites          F-WavesMedian (s)        index and middle        wristUlnar (s)        5th                wristRadial (s)        thumb                forearmMedian...
 
Type 2 prion disease, immunohistochemical stains sectioned from hippocampus. (image)

 
Lewy Body, substantia nigra neuron x 400 (image)

 
Classic Lewy body within locus ceruleus, H&E stained section x 600 (image)

 
Extraneuronal Lewy bodies, H&E stain X 600 (image)

 
Progressive supranuclear palsy, dentate nucleus of cerebellum, H. and E. stain x 200 (image)

 
Cerebellar degeneration, H&E stained section x 20 (image)

 
Spinocerebellar atrophy, H&E section through cerebellar folia x 40 (image)

 
Frontotemporal lobar degeneration, ubiquitin immunoreactivity within dentate gyrus of hippocampus. (image)

 
Neuronal mineralization, thalamic neurons, H&E stain (image)

 
Oligodendrocyte with arrow (image)

 
Kearns-Sayre syndrome, H&E section of substantia nigra x 200 (image)

 
Kearns-Sayre syndrome, high power H&E stained section of substantia nigra (image)

 
Bilateral perisylvian ulegyria with periventricular nodular heterotopias, coronal section of brain. (image)

 
Familial myoclonic epilepsy, high power H&E stained section of brain (image)

 
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, ultrastructural examination of peripheral blood lymphocytes (image)

 
White Matter Neurons, neurofilament immunohistochemical stain (image)

 
White Matter Neurons in temporal lobe epilepsy. (image)

 
Focal cortical dysplasia, Palmini 2b, low-power overview of cerebral cortex (image)

 
Focal cortical dysplasia, Palmini 2a, high power view of cerebral cortex (image)

 
Focal cortical dysplasia, Palmini 2a, low power overview H&E stained section of cerebral cortex (image)

 
Focal cortical dysplasia, Palmini 1b, high power H&E stained section (image)

 
Focal cortical dysplasia, Palmini 1b, low-power overview. (image)

 
Focal cortical dysplasia, Palmini 1a, H&E stain (image)

 
Prion Infections
Infection without inflammation – Prion diseases    A. PathogenesisHuman spongiform encephalopathies are a group of disorders that share certain clinical, pathological, and pathogenetic features. All cause a progressive, fatal, dementing illness; most...
 
Viral Infections
The most common causes of viral meningitis in the U.S. are nonpolio enteroviruses (coxsackie and echovirus), which often occur in summer and early fall. Infection is by the fecal-oral route, with primary viral replication in the GI and upper respiratory tracts...
 
Alzheimer's disease, nucleus basalis of Meynert x 400 (image)

 
Demyelinating disease
Leukoencephalopathy is shorthand for a disease that preferentially manifests as damage to the white matter of the brain. While often referred to as “demyelinating diseases”, axonal damage is present in all of these disorders (in contrast to nearly...
 
Tumors II: Glial and Glioneuronal Tumors
A. Neurons 1. As differentiated neurons do not normally divide, tumors derived from such cells (ganglion cell tumors) are rare, and when they occur are usually benign.2. As the external granular cell neurons of the cerebellum are actively replicating and migrating...
 
ALS
Also referred to as motor neurone disease (by the British), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and ultimately fatal disorder characterized by degeneration of the upper and lower motor neurons of the brain and spinal cord. ALS occurs worldwide...
 
Parkinsonian neurodegenerative diseases
In 1817, James Parkinson wrote his Essay on the Shaking Palsy. He described a disorder manifest as involuntary tremulous motion…with a propensity to bend the trunk forward and to pass from a walking to a running pace: the senses and intellects being uninjured...
 
Other neurodegenerative diseases
Huntington Disease (HD) is inherited as an autosomal dominant disease with full penetrance. It occurs worldwide with an overall prevalence of 10 per 100,000 population (similar to the prevalence of ALS), although high regional concentrations are found due to large individual kindreds...
 
Normal samples
In order to recognize pathology, it is necessary to know what normal tissues look like. To that end, we present here a set of slides which depict normal anatomy, both on the gross and microscopic level. Throughout this course, whenever new pathologic concepts...
 
Alzheimer Disease
Alzheimer's Disease is the most common dementing illness and can occur at any age over 30. It tends to affect women more than men, even when survival differences are taken into account. It is relatively uncommon before age 65, affecting about 0.1% of the...
 
Vascular Disease 1: Reaction to ischemic injury
There are different types of ischemic injury.  Ischemia can affect the entire brain, or just a particular vascular distribution.  It can be brief, as in a TIA, or it can endure.  The patterns of damage we see in gross and microscopic pathology reflect the focality and temporal course of the ischemia...
 
Viral Encephalitis
A. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Encephalitis 1. Pathogenesis HSV-1 encephalitis is the most common cause of acute sporadic encephalitis in the U.S. It typically causes lip and mouth lesions (herpes labialis and stomatitis). Note the distinction from HSV-2,...
 
The Pathology of Alzheimer Disease
A.     Epidemiology AD is the most common dementing illness and can occur at any age over 30. It tends to affect women more than men, even when survival differences are taken into account. It is relatively uncommon before age 65, affecting about 0.1% of...
 
Cresyl Violet - Normal Example (image)

 
Bodian Stain - Normal Example (image)

 
Organizing Infarct, coronal section through thalamus with transverse section of spinal cord. (image)

 
Laminar Necrosis, coronal section at level of thalmus (image)

 
Eosinophilic Neuronal Degeneration, Hippocampus, H&E x40 (image)

 
Eosinophilic Neuronal Degeneration, Hippocampus, H&E x200 (image)

 
Eosinophilic Neuronal Degeneration, Cerebellum, H&E x200 (image)

 
Cerebellar Sclerosis, Sagittal sections (image)

 
Glioneuronal Tumor with Neuropil Islands, medium power GFAP immunohistochemical stain (image)

 
Glioneuronal Tumor with Neuropil Islands, synaptophysin immunohistochemical staining x 100 (image)

 
Glioneuronal Tumor with Neuropil Islands, synaptophysin immunohistochemical staining x 40 (image)

 
Glioneuronal Tumor with Neuropil Islands, H&E stain x 200 (image)

 
Glioneuronal Tumor with Neuropil Islands, H&E stain x 40 (image)

 
Oligodendroglioma, cortical invasion with perineuronal satellitosis (image)

 
Lhermitte-Duclos disease, H&E stained section (image)

 
Dysembryoplastic Neuroepithelial Tumor, H&E stain (image)

 
Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma, intraoperative smear preparation x 200 (image)

 
Infiltrating Glioma, Thalmus, neurofilament immunohistochemical staining x 200 (image)

 
For Comparison, Normal Neuropil (image)

 
Normal Neuropil with structures highlighted (image)

 
Vanishing white matter disease (image)

 
Normal Neuropil with structures highlighted (image)

 
Vanishing White matter disease, H&E stain, high power, Labeled (image)

 
Immature Teratoma of pineal region, H&E stain x 40 (image)

 
Rabies encephalitis, Negri bodies within the cytoplasm of cerebellar Purkinje cell neurons. (image)

 
West nile virus myelitis, H&E stained section (image)

 
HIV encephalopathy, p24 immunohistochemical staining for HIV (image)

 
Acute methyl bromide toxicity, coronal section of brain, close up (image)

 
Methotrexate neurotoxicity, H&E stain section, high power with arrow (image)

 
Methotrexate neurotoxicity, H&E stained section x 100 with arrow (image)

 
Vanishing white matter disease (image)

 
Acute hypotensive brainstem necrosis, hypoglossal nucleus, H&E stain (image)

 
Cortical Tuber, medium-power hematoxylin and eosin stained section (image)

 
Cortical Tuber, low-power hematoxylin and eosin stained section (image)

 
Alzheimer's disease, globose neurofibrillary tangle within the locus ceruleus (image)

 
Congenital muscular dystrophy x200 (image)

 
Rosetted Glioneuronal Tumor IVth Ventricle H&E with arrow (image)

 
Malformations 01
359
 
NeurOnc 03
367
 
Illustration of a hippocampal neuron (image)

 
Hirano Body 600x (image)

 
Other Glial and Glioneuronal Tumors

 
Negri Body from CDC Rabies page (image)

 
Photomicrograph of H&E stained brain tissue from a rabies encephalitis patient. (image)

 
Normal Neuropil with structures highlighted (image)

 
Normal Neuropil - Highlighted (image)

 
Normal Neuropil - Basic Cell Types (image)

 
Lewy Body x600 with arrow (image)

 
Basic Neuropathologic Reactions 1 (video)

 
Rosetted Glioneuronal Tumor IVth Ventricle H&E (image)

 
Acute neuronal necrosis cerebellum 2 (image)

 
Acute neuronal necrosis - cerebellum (image)

 



Gallery Images



White Matter

 
Neuron with oligodendrocyte and

 
Grey Matter vs White Matter

 
Oligodendrocyte

 
Neuron myelin segment

 
Neuron myelin

 
Neuron axon

 
Neuron dendrites

 
Neuron soma

 
Neuron with connections

 
Neuron with afferent connections

 
Neuron, numbered

 
Neuron

 
ALS crim

 
Neuron Specific Antigen

 
Upper vs Lower Motor Neuron Sign

 
Neuron - Soma

 
Neuron

 
Rosetted glioneuronal tumor of t

 
Rosetted glial neuronal tumor of

 
MSA Hot Cross Bun sign 2

 
MSA Hot Cross Bun sign

 
Oligodendrocyte with arrow

 
Vanishing white matter disease

 
Vanishing White matter disease,

 
Methotrexate neurotoxicity, H&E

 
Methotrexate neurotoxicity, H&E

 
Rosetted Glioneuronal Tumor IVth

 
Glioneuronal Tumor with Neuropil

 
Glioneuronal Tumor with Neuropil

 
Glioneuronal Tumor with Neuropil

 
Glioneuronal Tumor with Neuropil

 
Lafora Bodies

 
Glioneuronal Tumor with Neuropil

 
Illustration of a hippocampal ne

 
Hirano Body 600x

 
Normal Neuropil - Neurons

 
Negri Body from CDC Rabies page

 
Photomicrograph of H&E stained

 
Normal Neuropil - Highlighted

 
Normal Neuropil - Basic Cell Typ

 
Gray668.png

 
Gray746.png

 
Gray758.png

 
Gray772.png

 
Gray882.png

 
Lewy Body x600 with arrow

 
Mineralized neurons H&E

 
White Matter Neurons

 
White Matter Neurons NFihc

 
Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis V

 
Extraneuronal LBs x600

 
Eosinophilic Neuronal Degenerati

 
Eosinophilic Neuronal Degenerati

 
Eosinophilic Neuronal Degenerati

 
Rosetted Glioneuronal Tumor IVth

 
Acute neuronal necrosis cerebell

 
Acute neuronal necrosis - cerebe

 
Cerebellar Sclerosis

 
Substantia nigra neuromelanin